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Stellar Spectral Classification
Richard O. Gray & Christopher J. Corbally

Book Description | Reviews
Chapter 1 [in PDF format]

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Preface xi
Important Note on Terminology and Units xv

Chapter 1. The History and Philosophy of Stellar Spectral Classification 1
1.1 Early History 1
1.2 Later Developments 10
1.3 The MK Process 17

Chapter 2. An Overview of the Normal Stars 32
2.1 Introduction 32
2.2 The Spectral Sequence 32
2.3 Multicolor Photometry and Stellar Classification 44
2.4 Physical Principles Underlying the MK Sequence 50

Chapter 3. The OB Stars--Nolan R. Walborn 66
3.1 Introduction 66
3.2 The Optical 66
3.3 The Ultraviolet 75
3.4 The Infrared--Margaret M. Hanson 81
3.5 Peculiar Categories 89
3.6 X-Ray Line Spectra 102
3.7 Calibration and Astrophysical Modeling 105

Chapter 4. The B-type Stars 115
4.1 Introduction 115
4.2 Optical Classification 115
4.3 The Ultraviolet 120
4.4 Chemically Peculiar B-type Stars 123
4.5 Be Stars and B Shell Stars 135
4.6 Other B-type Emission-line Stars 143
4.7 B-type Stars in Advanced Evolutionary States 147

Chapter 5. The A-type Stars 160
5.1 Introduction 160
5.2 Optical Spectral-type Criteria 160
5.3 Ultraviolet and Infrared Classification Schemes 169
5.4 Chemically Peculiar Stars 176
5.5 Herbig Ae/Be Stars 200
5.6 A-type Stars in Advanced Evolutionary Stages 207
5.7 A-type Shell Stars 213

Chapter 6. The F-type Stars 221
6.1 Introduction 221
6.2 Optical Classification 221
6.3 Classification in the Ultraviolet and Infrared 227
6.4 Population II F-type Stars 236
6.5 Chemically Peculiar F-type Stars 244
6.6 F-type Stars in Advanced Evolutionary Stages 249

Chapter 7. The G- and K-type Stars 259
7.1 Introduction 259
7.2 Optical Classification 259
7.3 The Infrared 265
7.4 The Search for a Solar Twin; Chromospheric Activity 270
7.5 T Tauri Stars 275
7.6 Chemically Peculiar G- and K-giants 278
7.7 Population II and III Stars 281
7.8 The High Luminosity, Yellow Variables 283

Chapter 8. The M-type, S-type, and Carbon Stars 293
8.1 Introduction 293
8.2 The M-type Stars 293
8.3 The Carbon Stars 306
8.4 The S-type Stars 321
8.5 Symbiotic and Algol Stars 331

Chapter 9. M Dwarfs and L Dwarfs--J. Davy Kirkpatrick 339
9.1 Introduction 339
9.2 The Discovery of M Dwarfs and L Dwarfs 339
9.3 Spectroscopic Classification 341
9.4 Physical Interpretation of Types 362
9.4 Peculiar Objects 372

Chapter 10. The T-type Dwarfs--Adam J. Burgasser 388
10.1 Introduction 388
10.2 Recognition of the T Dwarf Class and Early Discoveries 389
10.3 T Dwarf Spectral Characteristics 391
10.4 Near-Infrared Classification 396
10.5 Optical Classification 417
10.6 Mid-Infrared Classification 425
10.7 Additional Considerations for T-Dwarf Classification 428
10.8 Beyond the T Dwarfs 434

Chapter 11. Wolf-Rayet Stars and the Luminous Blue Variables 441
11.1 The Wolf-Rayet Stars 441
11.2 Luminous Blue Variables 465
11.3 Evolutionary Connections 468

Chapter 12. Endpoints of Stellar Evolution 472
12.1 Proto-Planetary Nebulae and Planetary Nebula Nucleus Stars 472
12.2 White Dwarf Stars 472
12.3 Novae 482
12.4 Supernovae 497

Chapter 13. Further Techniques 507
13.1 Introduction 507
13.2 Composite Spectra 507
13.3 Classification Systems in the Thermal Infrared 515
13.4 Other Classification Systems 522
13.5 Automated Methods of Spectral Classification 525
13.6 Low Dispersion Techniques and Natural Groups 529

Glossary 541
Appendix A: MK Standard Stars 555
Appendix B: Calibrations of the MK System 565
Appendix C: The Book Website 571
General Index 573
Object Index 585

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File created: 10/23/2013

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