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Tocqueville:
The Aristocratic Sources of Liberty
Lucien Jaume
Translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Book Description | Reviews
Introduction [in PDF format]

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Introduction 1
PART ONE. WHAT DID TOCQUEVILLE MEAN BY "DEMOCRACY"? 15
1. Attacking the French Tradition: Popular Sovereignty Redefined in and through Local Liberties 21
2. Democracy as Modern Religion 65
3. Democracy as Expectation of Material Pleasures 82
PART TWO. TOCQUEVILLE AS SOCIOLOGIST 95
4. In the Tradition of Montesquieu: The State-Society Analogy 101
5. Counterrevolutionary Traditionalism: A Muffled Polemic 106
6. The Discovery of the Collective 115
7. Tocqueville and the Protestantism of His Time: The
Insistent Reality of the Collective 129
PART THREE. TOCQUEVILLE AS MORALIST 145
8. The Moralist and the Question of l'Honnête 147
9. Tocqueville's Relation to Jansenism 159
PART FOUR. TOCQUEVILLE IN LITERATURE: DEMOCRATIC LANGUAGE WITHOUT DECLARED AUTHORITY 193
10. Resisting the Democratic Tendencies of Language 199
11. Tocqueville in the Debate about Literature and Society 226
PART FIVE: THE GREAT CONTEMPORARIES: MODELS AND COUNTERMODELS 249
12. Tocqueville and Guizot: Two Conceptions of Authority 251
13. Tutelary Figures from Malesherbes to Chateaubriand 291
Conclusion 319
Appendix 1. The Use of Anthologies and Summaries in Tocqueville's Time 327
Appendix 2. Silvestre de Sacy, Review of Democracy in America 328
Appendix 3. Letter from Alexis de Tocqueville to Silvestre de Sacy 335
Index 337

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File created: 7/11/2014

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