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Myth and Measurement:
The New Economics of the Minimum Wage
David Card & Alan B. Krueger

Book Description | Table of Contents

ADDITIONAL REVIEWS:

". . . the nastiest, most unspeakable perversion of our service-based economy [is] the declining value of the minimum wage. . . . The downward pressure on wages is making this a country where working literally doesn't pay. . . . David Card and Alan Krueger show through meticulously assembled data that increasing minimum pay in the fast-food industry has no discernable effect on the number of jobs, on consumer prices, or even on employee benefits like free meals. . . . Labor markets, like so many other phenomena in the real world, are far from perfect and do not behave according to the theories of defunct economists."--Joe Conason, The New York Observer

"Myth and Measurement . . . traverses its ground in great detail, studying every bump and dip in the landscape. . . . But that's just about what the issue requires. Card and Krueger's conclusion runs so against the grain of mainstream economic thinking, not to mention the present political consensus, that overkill seems quite appropriate. That conclusion, reached through a number of separate studies, is this: The minimum wage not only doesn't kill jobs, it may even stimulate employment. . . . Myth and Measurement should be a very important book. It essentially settles the policy debate on the minimum wage, and the economics profession should spend a good bit of time engaging in profound reflection and in testing some of the field's first principles."--Voice Literary Supplement

"Card and Krueger have written a powerful book underpinned by hard facts. . . . They explode myths and indict the prescriptions of conventional economic thinkers. Few will read this book from cover to cover, but many will quote its conclusions in the months to come."--New Statesman and Society

"A very substantial book. . . . A highly persuasive collection of evidence. . . . An exemplary book."--J.W. Anderson, The Washington Post

"Myth and Measurement may well be the most important labor economics monograph of the 1990s."--Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Industrial and Labor Relations Review

"This book offers the most careful and wide-ranging analysis of the empirical evidence on minimum wages in the United States that any social scientist could ask for."--Richard B. Freeman, Industrial and Labor Relations Review

"Although this book raises very sharp questions about the practice of labor economics, the book itself is terrific. CK's creative careful, and above-the-board empirical work is a model of how to do good believable research and this book will be influential for a long time."--Paul Osterman, Industrial and Labor Relations Review

ADDITIONAL ENDORSEMENTS:

"Most economists believe that minimum wages invariably reduce employment, but are they right? In this compelling analysis of the U.S. minimum wage, Card and Kreuger show that recent increases in the minimum wage had no adverse effect on employment. This pathbreaking book suggests that economists know less about what the invisible hand is up to than they let on."--Richard Freeman, London School of Economics and Harvard University

"Myth and Measurementis an extraordinarily important book. It will rank with seminal works in labor economics, including Gary Becker's Human Capital, Jacob Mincer's Schooling, Earnings, and Experience, Richard Freeman and James Medoff's What Do Unions Do?, and Edmund Phelp's (ed.) Microeconomic Foundations of Employment and Inflation Theory. The book will interest everyone involved in the minimum wage debates, and it will cause economists to question seriously the models they use and how they do empirical research."--Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Cornell University

"The analysis of minimum wage by Card and Krueger is both comprehensive and provocative. It challenges the received wisdom and is certain to be a major influence on all future work on the topic."--James J. Heckman, University of Chicago

"Myth and Measurement is an extraordinarily important book. It will rank with seminal works in labor economics, including Gary Becker's Human Capital, Jacob Miner's Schooling and Earnings, Richard Freeman and James Medoff's What Unions Do?, and Edmund Phelp's (ed.), Microeconomic Foundations of Employment and Inflation Theory. The book will interest everyone involved in the minimum wage debates, and it will cause economists to question seriously the models they use and how they do empirical research."--Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Cornell University

"In Card and Krueger's hands, the collage becomes a dangerous weapon; the idea that employment has fallen significantly in the wake of minimum wage increases is attacked with both new evidence and a careful look at previous studies."--Charles Brown, University of Michigan

"The most professional work ever done on this highly controversial subject."--Richard Layard, London School of Economics

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File created: 4/8/2014

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