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The Novel, Volume 2:
Forms and Themes
Edited by Franco Moretti
Editorial Board: Ernesto Franco, Fredric Jameson, Abdelfattah Kilito, Pier Vincenzo Mengaldo, Mario Vargas Llosa

Book Description | Table of Contents
Preface [in PDF format] | Eco from Vol. 2 [PDF only] | Anderson from Vol. 2 [PDF only] | Schwarz from Vol. 1 [PDF only] | Arac from Vol. 1 [PDF only]

ADDITIONAL REVIEWS:

Praise for Italian edition: "There are books that you read and reread, others that you consult when useful or just for the pleasure . . . . [The Novel] belongs to both categories because it is much more than a mere collection of essays on a specific subject (in this case, the novel as literary genre, reinterpreted through contributions by novelists, critics, philosophers, anthropologists, and historians from every part of the world). Its changing, evocative flavors are so mouthwatering that it is like a platter of tapas, the little appetizers served by Catalans before a meal, which often take the place of an entire meal. The topic is books--a continuous game of citations and reflections. From the outset, it gives the reader symptoms of an ancient hunger. We are not sure what pushes us to read it and we try to grab and hold on to as much of it as possible . . . . [The Novel] is not a book. It is a Pantagruelian feast that awakens limitless appetites. It helps to remind us how many flavors can be found in literature and--above all--how many we have lost by eating fast food for the brain."--Diego De Silva, Il Mattino

Praise for Italian edition: "[These] interesting, useful books . . . are not humble, simply informative manuals: they offer essays that lead in multiple directions and examine fundamental problems and questions. They assess the breadth of current studies and they establish an analytical horizon for advanced contemporary culture."--Giulio Ferrot, L'Unita

"When you open The Novel . . . you may think you know what a novel is; by the time you close it . . . you are no longer sure. . . . The sheer diversity of topics here is exciting and opens up many new horizons. . . . It is impossible to understand why the novel has been the quintessential modern art form, and why it has appealed to writers and readers around the globe, without understanding the circumstances of its rise in Western Europe in the 18th century. . . . [I]t helped to incarnate the modern sensibility, and to teach its readers what it means to be modern. . . . If the novel is indeed losing its central position in our imaginative life . . . it can only be because modernity itself is slipping away, with all it distinctive promise and menace."--Adam Kirsch, New York Sun

"An essential resource for all academic collections serving students of language and literature."--Thomas L. Cooksey, Library Journal

"This two-volume set is the most important resource on the novel now available. Like the novel itself, this work spans the globe and the centuries. . . . Essential."--Choice

"No reader will come away from these volumes without a long list of novels they now want to read--novels, in many cases, well-known within their own linguistic or national tradition but unfamiliar outside of it. . . . [This is] a project so capacious, so audacious, so polyvocal--in a word, so novel."--Leah Price, Novel: A Forum on Fiction

"There is a great deal to relish here...Moretti and his contributors have succeeded in making the study of the novel--if not the entire 'literary field'--'longer, larger and deeper' that it was before, or than any single scholar could ever make it."--London Review Bookshop

"Hugely ambitious. . . . Explores fiction with a capaciousness that's exhilarating as well as eye-opening, as a galactic crew of critics swoop in on subjects ranging from ancient China to Toni Morrison."--Marina Warner, The New Statesman

"Moretti's ability in his own criticism to use a playful, informal style is quite remarkable; he quickly puts readers at ease as he calls into question a great deal of what they think they know about narrative. . . . In short, both the range and the content of these essays are exceptionally lively and dynamic, and the writing is sophisticated."--Brian Evenson, Novel: A Forum on Fiction

"There is very much worth exploring in Moretti's excellent collection of essays. . . . Moretti's fine collection is a robust testimony to the novel's long, complex, multicultural history."--Steven D. Smith, International Journal of the Classical Tradition

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File created: 9/23/2014

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