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Social States:
China in International Institutions, 1980-2000
Alastair Iain Johnston

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ADDITIONAL ENDORSEMENTS:

"This eagerly awaited book offers the most compelling analysis for China's 'peaceful rise' that I know of. Iain Johnston displays a complete mastery of international relations theory, a profound knowledge of Chinese foreign policy and East Asian regionalism, and impressive control over modern social science methods. For many years to come this will be the landmark study of one of the most important developments in contemporary world politics."--Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University

"Iain Johnston's Social States is a must-read for all students of international relations theory, international institutions, and international security. With his characteristic hardheaded and systematically minded approach to the big debates in international relations, Johnston has produced the single-best statement regarding socialization in contemporary global affairs. And his deep knowledge of China and institutional institutions allows him to address some of the most critical questions regarding the future global order."--Michael Barnett, University of Minnesota

"This is a timely, compelling, and deeply impressive piece of scholarship by one of the very best world-class international scholars writing on Chinese foreign policy and international relations theory today. The vividness of the writing, combined with coherent organization and dispassionate empirical analysis, are certain to make this an essential work for seasoned China watchers. At the same time, the book's bold and analytically arresting observations will compel policymakers to question their personal assumptions and hidden prejudices."--Samuel Kim, Columbia University

"In his latest first-rate work, Iain Johnston argues that, over the past twenty years, China has been socialized--often without side payments and at the expense of its narrow security interests--to be a more cooperative partner in international relations. His argument will be widely read and is sure to provoke the critics-- but it is too carefully conceived and documented to dismiss."--Jeffrey W. Legro, University of Virginia

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File created: 8/19/2014

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