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Hubbert’s Peak:
The Impending World Oil Shortage
Kenneth S. Deffeyes
With new commentary by the author

Book Description | Table of Contents
Chapter 1 [HTML] or [PDF format]

ADDITIONAL REVIEWS:

Praise for the previous edition: "Deffeyes, using Hubbert's methodology, shows that the trajectory of world reserves is closely following the pattern of U.S. discovery and depletion, with just a few decades' lag. Drilling deeper, in more remote locations, and with more elaborate technologies won't tap reserves that don't exist. . . . America's energy policy needs to tilt away from oil and in favor of conservation, new technology, and domestic renewables. The time to act is now, before the next wave of gas lines and rationing is upon us."--Robert Kuttner, Business Week

Praise for the previous edition: "There are few things as important nowadays as the energy system, and few books on the subject as thought provoking as this one."--J.R. McNeill, Wilson Quarterly

Praise for the previous edition: "We have long been told that fossil fuels wouldn't last forever, but Deffeyes hypothesis is still startling: Sometime during the next decade, the supply of oil won't keep up with the demand. Because of its broad impact Hubbert's Peak is a must-read for almost everyone--scientists, policy-makers, environmentalists, people who buy cars."--Ann Wagner, NationalJournal.com

Praise for the previous edition: "An ideal freshman reading assignment in any geology course concerned with energy, geological resources, public policy, general science applications in our modern world, or similar topics. All teachers, from high school through graduate level, in all natural sciences, political science, government, business, and engineering courses should read this book and encourage their students to consider its ramifications in their fields."--C. John Mann, Journal of Geoscience

Praise for the previous edition: "[A] small and delightfully readable book."--Choice

Praise for the previous edition: "Deffeyes's unsettling message is that, although society has been slow to respond to the Hubbert's Peak forecast of world oil decline, a permanent drop in oil production will nevertheless begin within the next decade. Humanity has a brief period in which to wean itself from crude oil, increase energy conservation, and design alternative energy sources."--Dan Johnson, The Futurist

Praise for the previous edition: "I commend this book . . . to anyone concerned about the future development of planet Earth."--John Parker, Geoscientist

Praise for the previous edition: "This book sends a message loud and clear: World petroleum production is going to peak within this decade, maybe as early as 2005, but no later than 2009 and there is hardly any way of escaping from this truth. . . . The book is accessible, easy to read and informative."--Subhes C. Bhattacharyya, Natural Resources Forum

Praise for the previous edition: "In the politics of oil, the left is passionately, sentimentally, tree-huggingly pro-environment, while the right shrugs as it climbs into its official mascot, the biggest sport utility vehicle available. . . . In the slide down Hubbert's Peak, political differences will matter less. If those who planned the Sept. 11 attacks know as much about economics as they do about aeronautics, their next target may be the Saudi Arabian oil fields, on which America, Asia, and Europe are overly dependent."--Martin Nolan, The Boston Globe

Praise for the previous edition: "An intelligent, briskly written and refreshingly nontechnical book."--John R. Alden, Baltimore Sun

Praise for the previous edition: "This book . . . should be read . . . by all politicians, by all students, no matter what their discipline, and indeed by anyone concerned about their grandchildren's welfare. Reading Hubbert's Peak is the intellectual equivalent of bungee jumping, being simultaneously exhilarating and terrifying."--R. C. Selley, Geological Magazine

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File created: 11/10/2014

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