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The Financial Diaries:
How American Families Cope in a World of Uncertainty
Jonathan Morduch & Rachael Schneider

Book Description

Jonathan Morduch
Jonathan Morduch
(Photo Credit: Robin Holland)Rachael Schneider
Rachael Schneider
(Photo Credit: Negron)

An Interview with Jonathan Morduch & Rachael Schneider, authors of The Financial Diaries.

  1. What makes the U.S. Financial Diaries different from any other financial surveys of American households?

    We set out to find people who were willing to open up their entire financial lives to us for a year. Two hundred and thirty-five families and individuals let us track every dollar that they earned, spent, borrowed, and saved or that they revived from others.

    We got to know many of the families personally. And seeing 235 different lives allowed us to draw connections between people facing similar dilemmas in radically different situations–from undocumented migrant workers in northern California to middle-class families in Ohio. Because money touches so much of life, we could see most other parts of their lives too.

  2. Each of the book’s chapters opens with one of two individuals and followers their work and family life. Describe a memorable participant in the diaries project.

    The book opens with the story of Becky and Jeremy, a young couple raising a family in a small town in Ohio. Their story reveals a common struggle to achieve both mobility and stability. Jeremy was working full-time, fixing trucks on commission. Becky mainly stayed home to raise their children, volunteered, and occasionally cleaned houses on the side. Jeremy liked his job, but fixing 18-wheeler trucks is a seasonal business and Jeremy’s pay was unsteady. Even though Becky and Jeremy had many of the markers of middle-class life–a comfortable home, a tight community and solid employment–they felt incredibly insecure. At the end of the study Jeremy switched to a lower paying job with a longer commute–but at least it came with a steady paycheck.

  3. What do most of us not understand about the financial plight of the working and middle classes–and what can we learn from it?

    First, families feel insecure for perfectly good reasons–income and spending needs are often unpredictable and hard to manage, even for middle-class families. Second, people cope with the risks in surprising and inventive ways. They strategize with family members. They save actively, even if not for the long-term. They find ways to discipline their borrowing. None of the ideas are flawless, but some point to ways businesses and governments can create betters solutions. Maybe more important, the stories in the diaries show how unbalanced America has become in terms of whose shoulders are carrying most of the risk today.

  4. Why did you write this book?

    We have both spent our careers thinking about households and consumer finance, and our field has reams and reams of descriptive data about what people do—savings rates, the number of overdrafts, the size of their tax refunds. We have lots of financial information but very little of the existing data helped us understand why—why people make the financial decisions they make, and why they get tripped up. So we decided to spend time with a group of families, get to know them very well, and track every dollar they earned, spent, borrowed, and shared over the course of one year. By collecting new and different kinds of information, we were able to understand a lot of the why, and gained a new view of what’s going on in America.

  5. What did you learn about the financial lives of low- and moderate-income families in your year-long study?

    We saw that the financial lives of a surprising number of families looks very different from the standard story that most people expect. The first and most prominent thing we saw is how unsteady, how volatile households’ income and expenses were for many. The average family in our study had more than five months a year when income was 25% above or below their average.

    That volatility made it hard to budget and save—and it meant that plans were often derailed. How people were doing had less to do with the income they expected to earn in total during the year and more to do with when that income hit paychecks and how predictable that was. Spending emergencies added a layer of complexity. In other words, week-to-week and month-to-month cash flow problems dominated many families’ financial lives. Their main challenges weren’t resisting temptation to overspend in the present, or planning appropriately for the long term but how to make sure they would have enough cash for the needs they knew were coming soon.

    The resulting anxiety, frustration, and a sense of financial insecurity affected families that were technically classified as middle class.

  6. How does this tie into the economic anxiety that fueled Trump’s election?

    The families we talked to revealed deep anxieties that are part of a broader backdrop for understanding America today. That anxiety is part of what fueled Trump, but it also fueled Bernie Sanders and, to an extent, Hillary Clinton. A broad set of the population feels rightly that the system just isn’t working for them.

    For example, we met Becky and Jeremy, a couple with two kids who live in small town Ohio where Trump did well. Jeremy is a mechanic who fixes trucks on commission. Even though he works full-time, the size of his paychecks vary wildly depending on how many trucks come in each day. This volatility in their household income means that while they’re part of the middle class when you look at their annual income, they dipped below the poverty line six months out of the year.

    One day we met with Becky, who was deciding whether or not to make their monthly mortgage payment a couple of weeks early. She had enough money on hand, but she was wavering between paying it now so she could rest easy knowing it was taken care of, or holding onto the money because she didn’t know what was going to happen in the next couple weeks, and was afraid she might need the money for something else even more urgent. She was making decisions like this almost every day, which created not only anxiety but a sense of frustration about always feeling on the edge.

    Ultimately, Jeremy decided to switch to a lower-paying job with a bigger commute doing the exact same work – but now he’s paid on salary. They opted for stability over mobility. Becky and Jeremy helped us see how the economic anxiety people feel is not only about having enough money, but about the structure of their economic lives and the risk, volatility, and insecurity that have become commonplace in our economy.

  7. One of the most interesting insights from your book is that while these families are struggling, they’re also working really hard and coming up with creative ways to cope. Can you share an example?

    Janice, a casino worker in Mississippi, told us about a system she created with multiple bank accounts. She has one bank account close to her she uses for bill paying. But she also has a credit union account where she has part of her paycheck automatically deposited. This bank is an hour away, has inconvenient hours, and when they sent her an ATM card, she cut it in half. She designed a level of inconvenience for that account on purpose, in order to make it harder to spend that money. She told us she will drive the hour to that faraway bank when she has a “really, really need”—an emergency or cost that is big enough that she’ll overcome the barriers she put up on purpose. One month, she went down there because her grandson needed school supplies, which was a “really, really need” for her. The rest of the time, it’s too far away to touch. And that’s exactly how she designed it.

    We found so many other examples like this one, where people are trying to create the right mix of structure and flexibility in their financial lives. There’s a tension between the structure that helps you resist temptation and save, and the flexibility you need when life conspires against you. But we don’t have financial products, services, and ideas that are designed around this need and the actual challenges that families are facing. This is why Janice has all these different banks she uses for different purposes—to get that mix of structure and flexibility that traditional financial services do not provide.

  8. How does this tie into the conversation we’ve been having about inequality over the last decade or so?

    Income and wealth inequality are real. But those two inequalities of income and assets are hiding this other really important inequality, which is about stability. What we learned in talking to families is that they’re not thinking about income and wealth inequality on a day-to-day basis—they’re worrying about whether they have enough money today, tomorrow, and next week. The problem is akin to what happens in businesses. They might be profitable on their income statement, but they ran out of cash and couldn’t make payroll next week.

    This same scenario is happening with the families we met. We saw situations where someone has enough income or is saving over time, but nonetheless, they can’t make ends meet right now. That instability is the hidden inequality that’s missing from our conversation about wealth and income inequality.

  9. How much of this comes down to personal responsibility? Experts like Suze Orman and Dave Ramsey argue you can live on a shoestring if you’re just disciplined. Doesn’t that apply to these families?

    The cornerstone of traditional personal finance advice from people like Orman and Ramsey is budgeting and discipline. But you can’t really do that without predictability and control.

    We met one woman who is extremely disciplined about her budget, but the volatility of her income kept tripping her up. She is a tax preparer, which means she earns half her income in the first three months of the year. She has a spreadsheet where she runs all her expenses, down to every taxi she thinks she might need to take. She budgets really explicitly and when she spends a little more on food one week, she goes back and looks at her budget, and changes it for the next few weeks to compensate. Her system requires extreme focus and discipline, but it’s still not enough to make her feel financially secure. Traditional personal finance advice just isn’t workable for most families because it doesn’t start with the actual problems that families face.

  10. What can the financial services industry do to better serve low- and moderate-income families?

    The financial services industry has a big job in figuring out how to deal with cash flow volatility at the household level, because most of the products they have generated are based on an underlying belief that households have a regular and predictable income. So their challenge is to develop new products and services—and improve existing ones—that are designed to help people manage their ongoing cash flow needs and get the right money at the right time.

    There are a few examples of innovative products that are trying to help households meet the challenges of volatility and instability. Even is a new company that helps people smooth out their income by helping them automatically save spikes, or get a short-term “boost” to cover dips. Digit analyzes earning and spending patterns to find times when someone has a little extra on hand and put it aside, again automatically. Propel is looking to make it much easier and faster for people to get access to food stamps when they need them. There are a number of organizations trying to bring savings groups or lending circles, a way of saving and borrowing with friends and family common everywhere in the developing world, to more people in the United States.

    There is lots of scope for innovation to meet the needs of households—the biggest challenge is seeing what those needs are, and how different they are from the standard way of thinking about financial lives and problems.

 

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File created: 11/1/16

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