The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, Volume 68
April 8, 1922-1924
Arthur S. Link, Editor

John E. Little, Associate Editor


Volume 68 is the last narrative volume in The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, and it concludes with Wilson's death and the ceremonies that marked it. Before that, however, the volume deals with his partial recovery from the aftermath of his stroke of October 2, 1919, and his struggle to produce "The Document," which he intended to use as the Democratic platform in an attempt to win a third presidential term in 1924. During this period Wilson took a strong interest in the success of Democrats and insurgents in wresting control of Congress from the Harding administration in the congressional election of 1922. He looked forward confidently to the presidential election two years hence, remained as convinced as ever of the desirability of American membership in the League of Nations, and received the homage of the crowds who came constantly to his home.

Meanwhile, he maintained a voluminous correspondence and stayed in close touch with old colleagues. On January 16 he welcomed the members of the Democratic National Committee and a host of friends in his home. Serious talk in the newspapers about his candidacy in 1924 encouraged him to work on his acceptance speech and a third inaugural address. On January 27 and 28, however, his health suddenly began to fail, and he continued to decline until his peaceful death on February 3, at 11:55 in the morning.

First published in 1992.

Arthur S. Link is George Henry Davis '86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton University.