West Bengal and the Federalizing Process in India
Marcus F. Franda


Since its independence in 1947, India, as a large, diverse, and rapidly changing country, has had to meet federalizing problems of a magnitude unprecedented in history. The result has been a process that combines, modifies, and transforms many established ideas about federalism. Professor Franda deals with the complexities of India's experience by analyzing the politics of center-state relations as they affect one Indian state. He explores the various ways in which central and state leadership groups in India and West Bengal have developed working relationships, and examines the effect of state and regional political, economic, and social conditions on the evolution of center-state behavior patterns.

First published in 1968.

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