Books to read during Women’s History Month

Books to read during Women’s History Month

By Ideas Editor

A key component of Princeton University Press’s mission is to increase the representation of women across our publishing disciplines. Throughout Women’s History Month in March, we will be taking time to highlight the books by and about women who have pushed boundaries, affected change, redefined roles, or who have complicated our understanding of what it means to be powerful. Over the next few weeks, check our Ideas page for pieces from cancer biologist Athena Aktipis, economist Anne Case, and others.

 

The Preacher's Wife

The Preacher’s Wife: The Precarious Power of Evangelical Women Celebrities

From the New York Times bestselling author of Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved, this book is a fascinating look at the world of Christian women celebrities. Kate Bowler tells the compelling stories of women who most often started off as somebody’s wife and ended up as everyone’s almost-pastor. 

 

Votes for Women

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Marking the centenary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, Votes for Women is the first richly illustrated book to reveal the history, complexity, and underrecognized activists of the national suffrage movement. 

 

Keep the Damned Women Out

“Keep the Damned Women Out”: The Struggle for Coeducation

“Keep the Damned Women Out” is a groundbreaking history of how elite colleges and universities in America and Britain finally went coed.

 

The Amazons

The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World

In this deeply researched, wide-ranging, and lavishly illustrated book, National Book Award finalist Adrienne Mayor presents the Amazons as they have never been seen before. This is the first comprehensive account of warrior women in myth and history across the ancient world.

 

The Slow Moon Climbs

The Slow Moon Climbs: The Science, History, and Meaning of Menopause

The Slow Moon Climbs casts menopause, at last, in the positive light it deserves—not only as an essential life stage, but also as a key factor in the history of human flourishing.

 

Collins Making Motherhood

Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving

Making Motherhood Work is a moving account of working mothers’ daily lives—and the revolution in public policy and culture needed to improve them.

 

Where are the Women Architects?

Where Are the Women Architects?

Where Are the Women Architects? tells the story of women’s stagnating numbers in a profession that remains a male citadel, and explores how a new generation of activists is fighting back, grabbing headlines, and building coalitions that promise to bring about change.

 

Indian Sex Life

Indian Sex Life: Sexuality and the Colonial Origins of Modern Social Thought

Reframing the prostitute as a concept, Indian Sex Life overturns long-established notions of how to write the history of modern social thought in colonial India, and opens up new approaches for the global history of sexuality.

 

Forging the Franchise

Forging the Franchise: The Political Origins of the Women’s Vote

Exploring tensions between elected leaders and suffragists and the uncertainty surrounding women as an electoral group, Forging the Franchise sheds new light on the strategic reasons behind women’s enfranchisement.

 

Eva Palmer Sikelianos

Eva Palmer Sikelianos: A Life in Ruins​​​​​​

Eva Palmer Sikelianos: A Life in Ruins  is the first biography of the visionary twentieth-century American performer and remarkable nonconformist who devoted her life to the revival of ancient Greek culture.

 

Sofonisba's Lesson

Sofonisba’s Lesson: A Renaissance Artist and Her Work

Sofonisba’s Lesson sheds new light on Sofonisba’s work, offering a major reassessment of a Renaissance painter who changed the image of women’s education in Europe—and who transformed Western attitudes about who could be an artist.

 

The Life and Struggles of Our Mother Walatta Petros

The Life and Struggles of Our Mother Walatta Petros: A Seventeenth-Century African Biography of an Ethiopian Woman

This is the hardcover scholarly edition of the award-winning English translation of the earliest-known book-length biography of an African woman, and one of the few lives of an African woman written by Africans before the nineteenth century. It provides an exceedingly rare and valuable picture of the experiences and thoughts of Africans, especially women, before the modern era. It is also an extraordinary account of a remarkable life—full of vivid dialogue, heartbreak, and triumph.